50 most popular posts

Best of Retire By 40

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You can also go through all the articles on Retire By 40. It’s a bit of mess though. I’d start with the latest and then go backward. Many of the early articles weren’t that great.

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Cheers!

-Joe Udo

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Joe started Retire by 40 in 2010 to figure out how to retire early. After 16 years of investing and saving, he achieved financial independence and retired at 38.

Passive income is the key to early retirement. This year, Joe is investing in commercial real estate with CrowdStreet. They have many projects across the USA so check them out!

Joe also highly recommends Personal Capital for DIY investors. They have many useful tools that will help you reach financial independence.

Latest posts by retirebyforty (see all)

8 thoughts on “50 most popular posts”

  1. Hi there
    could somebody advice me, is it worthy to start study medicine at 45?
    I’m now retired but I’d like to start a study path again, something worthy when I become 50 more.
    please advice me with your experiences

    Reply
  2. Good for you! I also quit my 6-figure job last year and retired at 50. I did not plan for it, but made a few good moves that allowed me to retire early. The housing burst presented me with opportunity to buy rental properties at deep discount, and the income from the rents is more than enough to cover my basic needs. The rest of my saving is currently invested in the stock market. I think I found a strategy that works, but time will tell.

    Reply
  3. Great site, I will delve further, I am approaching 40 and have been a stay at home dad for the past five years–we saved a lot prior to the kid. We are financially stable, though we don’t any passive income outside some small investments and savings, but am so grateful that my wife enjoys her job. I sometimes feel guilty for enjoying my life, while my friends all talk about how busy and stressed they are–We live within in our means and I am interested in checking out your insights.

    Reply
  4. Um, I just stumbled across your blog today and enjoyed it, but didn’t see a “best place” to post a response other than the “Start Here” tab, which seems to be quiescent for awhile.

    I really enjoy your post and the responses on the subject of retiring in Santa Barbara. I think maybe that might be attractive to me, too, but I have a different mix of motivations. Number 1, I’m almost 60 (but not ready to be dead yet!). To be honest, I find SB very pretty, great weather, but I worry about being bored w/o the things a big city has to offer. Of course, there’s also the factor of how housing prices there are much more volatile, according to the national economy.

    Anyway, I look forward to hearing what you and your readers have to say on this and other subjects. Even us (relatively) old guys can benefit from listening to and participating in the conversation.

    Reply
    • Usually you can respond at the bottom of the page.
      Perhaps you can rent for a few months to see if you’d like it. SB is nice, but it is a small city.
      You could always drive to LA…
      I’m not sure about the housing price volatility there. I thought it was quite expensive, but pretty stable.

      Reply
  5. hi joe,

    came across your blog on the web .. retiring at 40 is great .. but staying almost 30yrs irrelevant to the society is a threat also .. i hope to be able to retire early too .. am 36 now .. good luck .

    Reply

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